January is National Radon Action Month
January is National Radon Action Month

January is National Radon Action Month

January is National Radon Action Month

If there is one thing that we can all agree on, it’s the importance of protecting our health. And yet, radon and its health risks go overlooked in many homes across America- despite it being the second leading cause of lung cancer; after cigarettes! According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), radon is estimated to cause around 21,000 lung cancer deaths in the United States every year. So why the oversight when it comes to radon? Well, it wasn’t until the mid-1980s that elevated levels of radon in homes were recognized as a potential public health threat. Then on top of that, every state’s risk level is drastically different due to things like terrain, uranium content in the soil, and how porous surface rock formations are. To give an example, Pennsylvania has one of the most serious radon problems in the United States. On average 4 out of 10 houses in Pennsylvania have very high levels of Radon. It’s for this reason The EPA recognizes January as Radon Action Month. In an effort to better inform homeowners and occupants of the potential risks that radon presents, and to get people to take action to resolve those issues before it affects the well-being of their families.

What is radon & how does it enter your home?

January is National Radon Action Month

In order to prevent issues, it helps to understand exactly what radon is and how it forms. Put simply, it’s an odorless and colorless gas that is produced when uranium, radium, or thorium decays in the soil. These are naturally occurring products that are harmlessly dispersed outside. However, when it accumulates inside your home through cracks in your basement or foundation is when it can pose health risks. If radon builds up in your space, it can cause long-term damage to your health. It’s impossible to tell how much is present in your home without testing for it.

When & how to test for radon?

I’ll be talking in broad strokes here, but if you want to know in more detail how radon is measured I recommend visiting our radon testing page. For right now, just know that the EPA set 4pCi/L as the action level for the United States back in 1988, and your home should be sitting below 2pCi/L on average.

For starters, both the EPA and the Pennsylvania DEP recommend that, whether you have a mitigation system or not, you test your home for Radon every two years. They also highly recommend performing retests after any major home renovation, especially if they involve structural changes or foundation repairs. This also could include finishing your basement or adjustments to your HVAC system. This is so that you don’t get caught unaware by an increase in your Radon levels. If you’ve already installed a radon mitigation system due to the previously elevated levels, performing a radon test is the only way to confirm that your system is working properly. Testing more frequently, once per year, is recommended.

January is National Radon Action Month

Parting thoughts

By taking these preventative measures, you will be taking a decisive step towards ensuring that radon will not become a source of financial distress or physical discomfort. However, if a major radon problem is discovered, be sure that licensed radon testing and mitigation professionals like Mold Medics become involved sooner than later. We help to protect homeowners by testing & mitigating radon gas. We provide professional Radon Testing & Sub Slab Depressurization Radon Mitigation System installation. We not only follow EPA & DEP standards but we are also certified by the DEP & have up-to-date DEP-issued photo identification cards. We’re highly confident in our services, which is why we always provide a warranty on the treatment date. Call us to learn more about our effective and safe radon solutions.

You can learn more about radon, and Mold Medics services, at the following links…

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